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How to Count Crochet Rows

Counting crochet rows is easy. Find out how with this tutorial!

By: Krista Childers for AllFreeCrochet.com
How to Count Crochet Rows

Learn How to Count Crochet Rows by following a few tips and rules. There are several different ways to count rows in crochet, so find the one that works best for you. Count them at the end by using the consistent markings, count them as you go with a counter, or mark each row once it's complete.

On this page, there are visual examples and explanations to show you exactly how to count crochet rows, making it easy for even beginner crocheters to understand. be a novice no more, once you learn this basic and necessary crochet skill.

Another helpful addition to this page, particularly for those aspiring crocheters who are just getting started, is how to count chains. We will go over the foundation of chains, how they look, and how to count them. It's a must-read for beginners.

 

Counting Crochet Chains and Rows

learn how to count both chains and rows in crochet. We have a lot of visuals to help those who like to see as well as read how-tos.
 

How to Count Chains in Crochet:

Before we get to counting rows, let's go over chains.

Chaining is the first step in a crochet project. With chains, it is vitally important to make sure you have the right number of stitches. Of course, it is always important in crochet, however, since this is the foundation, it is the most important.

To learn this basic technique, watch our video for How to Crochet the Chain Stitch.

Follow the steps below to learn how to count chain stitches.

  1. First, make sure you are counting the right side. 

    The back of the chain has bumps (shown on the left of the image below).
    The front of the chain has v shapes (shown on the right of the image below).

    You will count the Vs to determine how many chains you have crocheted.

  2. Count the V shapes you see. Each V is one chain. The example shown below has 9 chains.

How to Count Crochet Rows:

There are a few different ways to count rows in crochet. The easiest way is to count the horizontal dashes (or blocks, or knots) as you go. However, because these dashes only appear every other row, you have to double the number of blocks to get the total number of rows.

In the examples below, you will see how to count single crochet stitches as well as how to count double crochet rows. Each stitch is different, especially when it comes to height.

It is also more difficult to count if the crocheting is messy. The examples below aren't perfect and, as you can see, are not the easiest to count. But, they are realistic for most of us!

  1. Single crochet has shorter rows than most other types of crochet stitch.

    In the first image, you will see how a single crochet piece looks. There is a starting chain at the bottom. Try to find the horizontal dashes. How many rows do you think there are?

    In the second image, the horizontal dashes are marked in black. These represent every other row.

    In the third image, the black arrows and numbers show counting the crochet rows. As you can see, there are 6 rows.

  2. What about half double crochet? below, you will find an example of counting half double crochet rows.

    In the first image, you will see how a half double crochet piece looks. There is a chain but it almost blends in with the first row. Try to find the horizontal dashes. How many rows do you think there are?

    In the second image, the horizontal dashes are marked in black. These represent every other row.

    In the third image, the black arrows and numbers show counting the crochet rows. As you can see, there are 6 rows.

  3. Double crochet is easier to count because the rows are longer than single crochet. Other stitches, especially unique stitches like the shell or crocodile, make it easier to count because you can clearly see the design.

    In the first image, you will see how a double crochet piece looks. There is a starting chain on the bottom. Try to find the horizontal dashes. How many rows do you think are shown?

    In the second image, the horizontal dashes are marked in black. These represent every other row.

    In the third image, the black arrows and numbers show counting the crochet rows. As you can see, there are 4 rows in this double crochet sample.

  4. Our last example is for triple crochet. It is also known as treble crochet. Probably the easiest of the examples shown, this has distinct, long rows.

    In the first image, you will see how a triple crochet piece looks. There is a starting chain. Try to find the horizontal dashes. How many rows do you think there are?

    In the second image, the horizontal dashes are marked in black. These represent every other row.

    In the third image, the black arrows and numbers show counting the crochet rows. As you can see, there are 4 rows.

Counting Crochet Rows with Counters and Markers

Another way to keep track of your rows is by using a crochet counter and crochet row markers.

As you work, use the counter to keep track of the rows you create. Attach the markers to the end of each row, and count when you're done. It's super easy and saves time later.

Using one of these counting tools should be sufficient, but when you're working, it may be easy to forget to click the counter or add the marker. Using both allows for less chance of error.

It's best to get into the habit of marking your crochet as you go if it's important to you to know the number of rows. This is especially important if you are working on something large or taking a lot of breaks in between.

  1. Counters

    Counters can look different depending on the brand and the price. A simple counter, like the two shown in the picture below, are inexpensive alone or can be found as part of beginner crochet sets.

    Some other counters are bigger, can be worn on a finger or wrist, or around the neck.

  2. Lock Ring Crochet Markers

    One of the most common crochet markers is the lock ring marker, as shown below. These markers are essentially large plastic safety pins that can easily be added and removed from a row.

  3. Split Ring Markers

    The other common marker for counting crochet rows is the split ring marker. This is a large plastic one-dimensional coil that is twisted around a stitch in order to count the row.

    As you can see in the image below, there are different sizes and colors available, more than the two shown.

How do you count your crochet rows?

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I am constantly forgetting my row count when I restart my work after having to put it down to do something else and most of the time forgetting to make a notation of where I left off. There is a lot of good info in this article that I will never remember so I have bookmarked it for future reference.

When I first started, I really had no idea how to tell. Reading tips and the different ways to do it is so helpful.

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